Apple's intensely moving film about a teen with autism -- wow

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Winnie
Posts: 4227
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Apple's intensely moving film about a teen with autism -- wow

Postby Winnie » Mon Apr 04, 2016 12:26 am

Apple's intensely moving film about a teen with autism

He was "that kid."

That's how Dillan Barmache's therapist and communication partner Deborah Spengler describes their first meeting.

In her field, he was that kid who was "the most challenged."

In a film released by Apple to coincide with Autism Acceptance Month, Spengler and Dillan's mom Tami Barmache describe what learning to live around a non-verbal autistic teen is like.

You have to forget your standard notions of what communication really means. Just because someone isn't making eye contact with you, it doesn't mean they don't hear you or understand you.

"If you're just going off of what you see on the outside," says Tami Barmache, "the assumption is often that there's a lack of intelligence."

Article continues, with film: http://www.cnet.com/news/apples-intensely-moving-film-about-a-teen-with-autism/
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

JustinsDad
Posts: 63
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:24 pm

Re: Apple's intensely moving film about a teen with autism -- wow

Postby JustinsDad » Mon Apr 04, 2016 6:34 pm

Kinda OT but as a former Apple fanboy I would love to see Apple create a piece of technology that is sturdy enough to handle what a "lower functioning" autistic in the throes of a meltdown or locked in a self stimulatory loop can throw at it - literally. I think technology, is a wonderful thing, but I cannot celebrate it if it's constantly being broken by my child - even under supervision.
Neil

Father to Justin, age 12,'dx of ASD and ID and Joseph, age 9', dx of ADHD

Winnie
Posts: 4227
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Re: Apple's intensely moving film about a teen with autism -- wow

Postby Winnie » Tue Apr 12, 2016 11:47 pm

JustinsDad wrote:Kinda OT but as a former Apple fanboy I would love to see Apple create a piece of technology that is sturdy enough to handle what a "lower functioning" autistic in the throes of a meltdown or locked in a self stimulatory loop can throw at it - literally. I think technology, is a wonderful thing, but I cannot celebrate it if it's constantly being broken by my child - even under supervision.


You are so right! A friend's child recently cracked the school's iPad in a similar situation.

We have used several different types of protection for iPhones here (including my own), which have worked adequately (Otterbox and another I can't recall). Only my husband has an iPad, which has miraculously survived unprotected so far.

I noticed this link -- have you tried any of these brands or know someone who has?

13 Protective Cases That Will Keep Your Special Child’s iPad Air 2 Safe And Sound
http://www.friendshipcircle.org/blog/2015/04/29/13-protective-cases-that-will-keep-your-special-childs-ipad-air-2-safe-and-sound/
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

JustinsDad
Posts: 63
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:24 pm

Re: Apple's intensely moving film about a teen with autism -- wow

Postby JustinsDad » Mon May 30, 2016 11:55 am

Shock resistance is only part of our challenge. My son is transfixed by water and dunks everything in it. I've had three smart phones dropped in the toilet while I was distracted and he was in the tub.

Also, the latest and greatest is not always necessary. Voice recognition software has been around since the early 1990s. Slimmer devices with larger screens may be all the rage but personally, there's something to be said about smaller and sturdier.

That being said, my wife and I are currently "standing pat" with the iPhone 5S size and upgraded to the iPhone SE. I have a Lifeprof Nude case (the screen is not protected but a gasket keeps the case waterproof) that I've recycled from my iPhone 5S whose battery died.

Apple also doesn't have a lock on the market. I particularly like Samsung's products as they are sturdier (the past few iterations of the Galaxy S have been waterproof) and seem to last longer. When my IPhone 5S replacement got water damaged I had to deactivate a 5 year old Samsung Galaxy (which was also water damaged but still functional unlike the iPhone).

You'd think after as long as Apple's been in business that they'd want to reward brand loyalty by providing high quality and durable products that require less warranty claims but instead (at least in my experience) the opposite has been true and actually seems to be moving in the opposite direction of planned obsolescence.
Neil

Father to Justin, age 12,'dx of ASD and ID and Joseph, age 9', dx of ADHD


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