need help for our toddler.

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fay
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:43 am

need help for our toddler.

Postby fay » Sat Jun 03, 2017 2:08 pm

Our 2 ½ year toddler is getting tested in 2 weeks. We are so overwhelmed at the amount of information and how to help him. We feel so guilty for missing the signs and attempted to explain away lot of these behaviors (minimal eye contact, inattentive, repetitive clapping, babbling, reclusive with kids). We knew something was wrong but attributed to developmental delay or his personality. The pediatrician showed no concerns as well and played perfectly in our denial mode. No Family history of ASD. We finally accepted he has issues and started making changes 2 month ago. We got him in early intervention program. Right now, he is doing speech therapy twice a week and sensory therapy once a week. Wife quit her job to work with him.
Before age 2, he knew his letters, numbers up to 15, color and shapes. He could recite multiple nursery rhymes. He is the only child in house so we rationalized his solitary play around other kids. He is very friendly toward adults and loves to smile and play.
He didn’t have any other issues or behavioral issues except he would get constipated easily. As long as he was having greens (pureed food or smoothies) and wheat bread he was ok with his bowel movement. He drinks lots of regular milk and we added Gerber oat cereal for nutrition. He is a very picky eater. Only allergy he has is to penicillin.
Physically he is 95%tile in height and weight. He looks more like 3 or even small age 4 due to his height.
We currently shifted to silk almond milk from cow’s milk. We tried to do gluten free but he gets constipated.
Can anyone help us out with these questions because right now we are overloaded with information.
Caesin free, soy free and gluten free diet would be helpful for our child if he doesn’t seem to have any gi issues? Should we have him tested? Which test?
Getting him into day care around other kids would be helpful or not? Mom will be there with him.
How many more hours of OT and speech therapy per week?
How late are we in getting him help? We are losing sleep over feeling guilty for not picking up on it earlier.
Wife is reading up on son rising developmental model, Is ABA better? How many hours of aba therapy is needed. We were told he doesn’t have behavioral issues and he is too young for it at this time.
Should we get tested for metallic poising? Do we get referral from pediatrician for this test? He chewed on old pleather sofa when he stated walking at about 14 months. We eventually threw the sofa out when we pulled few pieces out of his mouth.
Any helpful suggestion would be greatly appreciated.

jaumeb
Posts: 167
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2016 10:48 am

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby jaumeb » Sun Jun 04, 2017 9:22 am

I use whole foods such as lentils, buckwheat, brown rice ...

Winnie
Posts: 4227
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Winnie » Sun Jun 04, 2017 11:44 am

A lot of this sounds so familiar I could have written it myself -- including the denial and rationalization part. Please don't torture yourself! He is still so young and you are already on the learning curve. Here is a post I wrote on this forum over a decade ago regarding the early days of our journey and what interventions we employed (all these years later my son is now a junior in college):
http://www.autismweb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=34612#p34612

I plan to return when I have more time to address some of your specific questions, but meanwhile, here is some reading that might be helpful in the "what to do now" department:
The 100 Day Kit (for families of newly-diagnosed children)
https://www.autismspeaks.org/docs/family_services_docs/100day2/100_Day_Kit_Version_2_0.pdf
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

fay
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:43 am

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby fay » Sun Jun 04, 2017 3:17 pm

Winnie wrote:A lot of this sounds so familiar I could have written it myself -- including the denial and rationalization part. Please don't torture yourself! He is still so young and you are already on the learning curve. Here is a post I wrote on this forum over a decade ago regarding the early days of our journey and what interventions we employed (all these years later my son is now a junior in college):
http://www.autismweb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=34612#p34612

I plan to return when I have more time to address some of your specific questions, but meanwhile, here is some reading that might be helpful in the "what to do now" department:
The 100 Day Kit (for families of newly-diagnosed children)
https://www.autismspeaks.org/docs/family_services_docs/100day2/100_Day_Kit_Version_2_0.pdf



Thanks you so much for your links. would you consider being our mentor or can you point to expereinced one avilable at least over phone to ask questions. will pay for your time. So much confusing info and so little time. Trying to find someone local parent for guidance but so far have not had much luck.

Dr. Krakouer
Posts: 9
Joined: Mon May 01, 2017 8:58 am

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Dr. Krakouer » Wed Jun 07, 2017 5:10 am

Greetings Fay,
I read with interest the descriptors that you provided in the forum regarding your son. In order to devise an informed intervention strategy it is vital to have the findings of the tests/evaluations, which I believe have yet to be conducted? So until do you have those findings, keep an open mind and try to stay objective and as calm as possible.

You mentioned Developmental Delay. Just to clarify D.D is a situation where a child has not yet reached a recognized milestone in terms of their physiological and psychological development. Fay, with D.D, it is not to say that it will never happen but at present, your son is just not where he should be and there can be a multitude of reasons for this, but I can assure you it is not ASD!

Correct me if I am wrong, but you are saying that prior to age 2 he demonstrated a skill level that could be considered typical in terms of development but at some point in between 2 years and 2.5 years something changed, for the worse? You mentioned that he chewed on the leather sofa, I assume you may believe that he ingested some toxins that in turn are causing these problems? I can tell you there is only a very minimal chance of that happening. However, having conducted, numerous hair and blood samples here in South East Asia, my studies found a disturbingly high level of Cadmium, Zinc. Lead and Mercury in either one or both the parents and also in the child diagnosed with ASD. So, yes, I would suggest a heavy metal check.

Certainly, do consider you son's diet, but also consider his sleep, exercise/physical activity and social activity routines. Fay, I am a fervent believer in skill development for children with D.D. and ASD. Specifically, in the deficits that you have mentioned, natural and consistent eye tracking, language, concentration and socialization which can and must be taught to your son to enable him to move forward with his life.

All the very Best in the coming weeks. Happy to talk further, either now or when you have the results in hand. Dr. P. Leith Krakouer

EmilyV
Posts: 74
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2017 9:41 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby EmilyV » Thu Jun 08, 2017 9:27 pm

Fay,
we were advised and I read in a trusted source (UpToDate - for medical professionals) that early intervention therapy such as ABA has to be 25 hours a week or more. Try to set it up first as it can take some time. We also are doing Denver Model - this book for parents which we love https://www.amazon.com/Early-Start-Your ... 160918470X. Our son's eye contact and interaction is noticeably much better when I do exercises from this book. This approach has also been proven by research to work. Get your little guy tested for chromosomal microarray and fragile X and for mitochondrial dysfunction - a pediatric neurologist can do it the latter. It is proven that at least 5% of kids with autism (Dr. Richard Frye's groundbreaking research) have a mitochondrial dysfunction that is treatable with a mitochondrial cocktail supplement, however I suspect that actually the real percentage is much more, just in most cases it was never identified. viewtopic.php?f=6&t=34092
There is also a definite link in many studies between Tylenol and higher risk of autism from it (it increases risk at least 1.6 times) probably because it's a mitochondrial toxin, so I wouldn't recommend giving any more Tylenol if you can avoid it.

Winnie,
I have been impressed with your previous posts and was intrigued about your personal experience. Thank you SO much for sharing! Your story is so inspiring.Could you summarize what interventions you found the most helpful (what types of therapy). What kind of training did you get? Have you ever figured out the cause of your son's initial diagnosis? Did you use/found helpful any biomedical treatments at all/saw effects on other children?
Has your child been struggling with any mental health issues (as you pointed out in your links, risks are higher even in optimal outcomes)
Thank you!

Winnie
Posts: 4227
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Winnie » Sun Jun 11, 2017 12:41 am

EmilyV wrote:Could you summarize what interventions you found the most helpful (what types of therapy).


Hi Emily – I began with your first question, and then went on so long that I will need to return later with responses to your other questions --

I felt that our (language-based) ABA home program was the most helpful -- though we didn’t pursue other therapies so I don’t have a list of others for comparison. We used the Verbal Behavior model (including Natural Environment Teaching) and found the ABLLS really helpful as a roadmap for planning programming and tracking progress. There are a number of ABA-based programs that are solid – including the Denver Model and others such as Pivotal Response Training – we settled on VB mostly on the heels of the first publication of the ABLLS.

I’m sure all of these programs are even better now than they were then (including VB) – evolving over the years, expanding scope, and better incorporating the social aspects of programming. There are even more choices now of assessment/tracking protocols (like Sundberg’s VB-MAPP and the EDSM checklist, for instance). At the time, the knowledge, resources, and professionals familiar with ABA-based programs in general were almost non-existent in my state.

My student therapist helpers were all OT grad students (except for one who was training/being mentored by a VB professional in CA), but we didn’t actually do any formal occupational therapy. We did often incorporate reinforcing activities that are usually included in an OT’s tool kit to engage him, reinforce skills, and teach language concepts. Our program was very language focused, and by language, I’m talking about a bigger landscape than just speech (since the terms speech and language are so often used interchangeably, but shouldn’t be).

Another thing I felt was extremely important for my son early on was his inclusion in a small typical preschool class, with typical language and social models, several mornings per week. I feel this inclusion needs to be supported in most cases (instead of the child just being present in the situation), so I offered to shadow. Incredibly, the teacher happened to be a mom with a master’s in special ed, and suggested a trial without me. This went well, so I did not shadow at the preschool, though much later on I did send a therapist during some optional stay-for-lunch/free play periods to facilitate social interaction with the other peers and work on language goals during this unstructured situation. I feel this first preschool year (with 5 other children and his wonderful, willing, and committed teacher) was fundamental to the successful pre-K years that followed as well as to his entry into public school kindergarten.

Finally – though it was born of necessity, I feel fortunate that I was able to be home and work with him myself, that my husband was fully onboard, and that his older sister was such an amazing playmate. I would encourage parents to seek training in the methodology and to be very familiar with their child’s programming. IMO it is essential that reinforcement and teaching opportunities in the child’s day/home environment be recognized (there is also research supporting the importance of parent involvement to the success of intervention).
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

fay
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:43 am

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby fay » Sun Jun 11, 2017 8:33 pm

Thank you Emily and winnie and Dr. Krakoueror for very helpful posts. we realize your time is precious and can't put in words how much we as parents appreciate your insight. I bought the book recommended above but i am worried sick about ABA. I gave up my job to with my son. Paying for ABA privately may not be option but how much would i expect to pay for it? His Dad is looking for ABA friendly insurance that employers offer. We are in TN and not sure if TEIS early intervention will cover the ABA. We are thinking about cashing out our savings for aba if husband is unable to find ABA friendly employer insurance. Is it possible to stop worrying about him all the time? My biggest fear is that he will be non-verbal. He is friendly and hugs his parents and therapists and sitters. He is intiating words now (like bottle, milk, jump, open, more, swing, faster..etc). We read any where from 25-30 % will be non-verbal or minimaly verbal. Are there any studies for kids with early interventions and heavily involved parents? I hope chances of being minimaly non- verbal would go down and that will make it easier to get sleep.

Winnie
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Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Winnie » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:57 am

fay wrote:I bought the book recommended above but i am worried sick about ABA. I gave up my job to with my son. Paying for ABA privately may not be option but how much would i expect to pay for it? His Dad is looking for ABA friendly insurance that employers offer. We are in TN and not sure if TEIS early intervention will cover the ABA.

Hi fay,

I can certainly identify with your concerns surrounding providing a program for your son, and I know the number of new learning curves to conquer right now feels overwhelming, but I also want to encourage you in your role as a therapist to your son.

The reality (bad news): funding these services may be difficult in your state. Tennessee is one of just a few states that does not mandate insurance coverage of ABA services – I noticed via media coverage recently since my own state (finally) did so just last month. I hope your husband is able to find and/or qualify for a plan that provides some coverage, though the parameters for coverage may be narrow.

I’m not knowledgeable about TEIS, though if anything like Early Intervention in my state, the frequency of contact hours is limited and primarily aimed at giving the parent very general tips. And the expertise of the therapists can vary dramatically – I would be surprised if anyone knowledgeable about ABA was involved with your son via EI.

When your child turns three, he should be eligible for preschool services through your school district, though it is unlikely that this program will provide ABA services. I passed on our district’s special needs preschool – I felt we needed those mornings for more effective and individualized instruction in our home program (the typical preschool already occupied several mornings). In my initial naivety, I considered requesting that the district help fund my home program, but after researching the likelihood of a successful legal challenge (necessary since my request was without precedent and would be rejected), I decided to commit that energy, time, resources, and mental health :) to working with him and cobbling together a program. However, your options for preschool services may be different from those of ours at the time, so you may want to include your district’s preschool services in his overall program.

Now, the good news: YOU are there.

I have known many parents who became knowledgeable and effective therapists for their children – in real life and online. After all, who knows him better, loves him more, or is more invested in his success than a parent? So -- if the insurance falls through, the preschool teacher is a nitwit, or his best therapist turns up expecting triplets – you are still there. You are the constant and know what to do.

Your questions sent me down memory lane for some examples of parents running a home program and working with their children, and I thought of Juliet Burke. She is a mom who ran a home program many years ago, was active on the parent listservs, and maintained a great site called Autism Teaching Tools (it is still there, here, but I’m not sure how often it has been updated since her children are adults now).

Anyway, I found her youtube channel – it’s interesting to see her children over so many years. I think she had 2 sons on the spectrum, though Evy (Everett) was the most affected. Here are two contrasting videos of Evy you may find encouraging:

Evy as a toddler:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZthrUYn9LXk ***

Years later, here is Evy – impromptu karaoke at a fair -- singing You Are Loved:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_GLO9st4Kw

Here is a link to Juliet’s youtube channel (keep hitting “load more” at the bottom – eventually you will find many earlier videos of Evy in sessions working on various skills, along with more recent videos of her family):
https://www.youtube.com/user/pentaburks/videos

fay wrote:We are thinking about cashing out our savings for aba if husband is unable to find ABA friendly employer insurance.

Since you are home with him, you may be able to pull together a program that is not so financially devastating. If other sources of funding fall through, I think investing in your own training, along with seeking some quality consultation and assessment by professionals, might be a good option. There are so many more resources accessible now – online training, webinars, print materials, and number of parents and professionals familiar with ABA in general.

***corrected link
Last edited by Winnie on Tue Jun 13, 2017 9:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

Ioana
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jun 09, 2017 10:30 am

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Ioana » Mon Jun 12, 2017 12:04 pm

Hello Fay,

I am an ABA therapist. If you need any help with your child program please contact me!

Winnie
Posts: 4227
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Winnie » Mon Jun 12, 2017 1:02 pm

(continued)

fay wrote:We are thinking about cashing out our savings for aba if husband is unable to find ABA friendly employer insurance.

Since you are home with him, you may be able to pull together a program that is not so financially devastating. If other sources of funding fall through, I think investing in your own training, along with seeking some quality consultation, might be an option. There are so many more resources accessible now – online training, webinars, print materials, etc.


fay wrote:Are there any studies for kids with early interventions and heavily involved parents?

Yes – there are many supporting the role of parents in intervention -- follows is one that came to mind since it more specifically involves ABA and a parent-directed model. This was a long-awaited study that was to serve as a replication to an earlier very well-known Lovaas UCLA clinic study. The very unexpected finding was, in short, that the children in the parent-directed programs did as well as those children enrolled in the clinic model:

Intensive Behavioral Treatment for Children With Autism: Four-Year Outcome and Predictors
Glen O. Sallows and Tamlynn D. Graupner
Wisconsin Early Autism Project (Madison)

“Parent-directed children, who received 6 hours per month of supervision (usually 3 hours every other week, which is much more than ‘‘parent- managed’’ or ‘‘workshop’’ supervision), did about as well as clinic-directed children, although they received much less supervision. This was unexpected, and it may have been due in part to parent-directed parents taking on the senior therapist role, filling cancelled shifts themselves, actively targeting generalization, and pursuing teachers and neighbors to find peers for daily play dates with their children. Although many parent directed parents initially made decisions regarding treatment that resulted in their children progressing slowly (e.g., using their treatment hours for ineffective interventions or pushing children to learn advanced skills before they were ready), resulting in frustration and occasionally ‘‘shutting down,’’ many parents then sought input from treatment supervisors and rapidly learned to avoid making the same mistake twice, becoming quite skillful after a few months.”
Full text: http://apschool.edu.hk/79_Sallows_2005.pdf



fay wrote:Is it possible to stop worrying about him all the time?

I can’t promise you won’t worry, second-guess yourself, and feel overwhelmed – I certainly did, but I do wish I had been able to do so less. I found an old post I wrote about that over a decade ago that pretty much summarizes my retrospective view:

I remember being racked with worry post-diagnosis – perhaps even more acutely prior to diagnosis. Probably the most difficult period was between age 2 and 3 1/2. It wasn’t so much the diagnosis that was difficult to accept – it was more so the very negative prognosis rendered by the “expert.” The expert’s office had a gloomy, dimly lit, funeral-ish atmosphere – and that pretty much matched what she had to say. She offered us grief counseling (it felt like…gee… should I chose the economy pine box with poly-satin, or the worm-proof deluxe model?).

I was really angry with this expert for a while.

In hindsight, if I regret anything, it is allowing worry and stress to steal the day during that time. I think we are tortured by the unknown -- at least initially -- wondering if we are doing the right thing, or enough of the right thing. We are so pressured to do enough, believe enough, hope enough, and worry enough. And I think sometimes we are afraid not to frantically respond to these pressures, as should we relax somewhat, we will somehow cast a hex of failure upon our child. Accepting the differences is not the same as surrendering hope.

I think accepting a diagnosis is different from accepting a prognosis. A child’s potential is unknown – it has not been captured and defined by the evaluator – the expert cannot own it with their words, will it so in a report, or assign a pre-determined timeline.

I don’t remember exactly when I released the typical child that I must have held hostage in my mind’s eye during that time. I think a peace and appreciation for the son I have -- even an admiration for his effort and accomplishment -- overcame that standard. And it didn't feel like giving up at all -- because it isn't a surrender of hope -- just a different perspective.
http://www.autismweb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=70035#p70035



fay wrote:He is friendly and hugs his parents and therapists and sitters. He is intiating words now (like bottle, milk, jump, open, more, swing, faster..etc).

Those are great emerging skills that are positive from a prognostic perspective – try to stay focused on developing the positive, and above all, enjoy your baby. :)
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

Winnie
Posts: 4227
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Winnie » Mon Jun 12, 2017 5:28 pm

Still catching up -- Emily, regarding your other questions:

EmilyV wrote:What kind of training did you get?

I attended training in CA at Behavior Analysts (Jim Partington’s agency) and they came to us once. I also traveled to various other conferences, read what materials were in print at the time, joined several online ABA parent groups, and had two other very knowledgeable parents who I collaborated with many times weekly (one had a VB consultant and the other a Lovaas replication site consultant). We did a lot of sharing, free-styling, and making adjustments to programming.

EmilyV wrote:Have you ever figured out the cause of your son's initial diagnosis?

No, I never have. And almost all of the parents who claim they know the cause of their child’s autism don’t actually know either. ;)

EmilyV wrote: Did you use/found helpful any biomedical treatments at all/saw effects on other children?

As far as biomedical interventions are concerned, I have administered some common supplements (like fish oil, vitamins, melatonin, etc) but none aimed at treating an identified underlying biomedical cause. Since my son didn’t have a comorbid condition (like seizures) requiring medication, we did not use prescription meds either. He did have periods of more rapid progress and also periods of plateau (and sometimes a slow trudge as far as acquisition rate), but we were usually unable to identify the cause unless it involved some teaching/programming errors on our part. Perhaps this was a more exaggerated and noticeable manifestation of the developmental spurts and plateaus that all children experience, but we don’t know for sure.

As far as children I know in real life (those that I have known for over a decade and am familiar with outcome), the majority saw a DAN (the designation then – same as MAPS now) doctor at some point, but none continued long-term. Almost all were GFCF at one time, but did not continue long-term, though several that I know of did continue to be casein free. Overall, all of the children I know made progress, though still fall at various points along the spectrum. Some that are the most severely affected today also began with the most severe diagnostic baselines, and their parents were among those who employed more biomedical treatments than average. None of the children I know locally are considered recovered, though I have met two children elsewhere who are/were considered recovered (at the time when I met them anyway).

EmilyV wrote:Has your child been struggling with any mental health issues (as you pointed out in your links, risks are higher even in optimal outcomes)

Not that we know of – though as he aged up through middle and high school, he met with increasingly complex social demands and experienced challenges that no doubt caused some anxiety (specifically, bullying). The increase in executive demands alone by middle school would probably justify a diagnosis of ADHD (inattentive type anyway) for a lot of kids on the spectrum. Though he does not have the typical social life of a college student (high school provided much more contact with peers and many more extracurricular opportunities), he is a happy guy. I don’t know what this will look like in the future, however.

The demands shift and increase over time, and those darn typical peers are moving the developmental goalposts (effortlessly) all the while ;). In many ways, progress and acquisition of skills sometimes seemed to reveal previously less noticeable challenges and areas of weakness that were running in the background. I know that probably sounds confusing and counter-intuitive – but if you like, I can try to explain via some examples.
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

fay
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:43 am

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby fay » Tue Jun 13, 2017 4:17 am

what are some good parents teaching videos or some good aba parents support online groups to join? Thanks

EmilyV
Posts: 74
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2017 9:41 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby EmilyV » Tue Jun 13, 2017 6:57 pm

Winnie,
thank you SO MUCH for sharing, i have read and re-read your latest posts and will use it as a reference! You should be really proud of what you did for your son, while it was even more difficult years ago.
This is very encouraging.
In the videos you posted, the first video was not of Evy of a toddler but of someone else actually. Thanks for posting these resources, sounds like me and Fay have some homework to do!
:D

Winnie
Posts: 4227
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Winnie » Tue Jun 13, 2017 9:24 pm

Thanks so much Emily. I'm really proud of my son's effort and perseverance over the years -- any credit for what he has accomplished (and overcome) truly belongs to him!

And yikes! Thanks for catching the link mistake -- not sure what happened there while I was browsing about on youtube. I corrected the Evy link -- in the process (I actually checked it this time ;)) I noticed that that her other son (Ethan) is the toddler at the end of the clip.
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

Winnie
Posts: 4227
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Winnie » Tue Jun 13, 2017 10:01 pm

fay wrote:what are some good parents teaching videos or some good aba parents support online groups to join? Thanks


fay, I know the platform for one of the very early lists I used went away years ago, and I checked yahoo groups for several that I was a member of years ago as well. The one that I found appeared to have very little activity -- I think everyone has probably migrated to newer platforms such as Facebook now. So I'm afraid I don't have any recommendations that I have experience with -- but you may be able to snag some leads by searching Fb and asking orgs connected to autism and to ABA specifically.

As for parent training videos -- again, not having watched what is available now, I wouldn't be a good source of a recommendation for specific videos. However, I do think a thread on the topic would be a good idea -- I'll start one on parent intervention training materials, and forum members can add to it when they trip across potential resources during their internet travels. I'll do some googling around too.

Here is a thread for posting parent training materials:
https://www.autismweb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=34436
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

Winnie
Posts: 4227
Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby Winnie » Tue Jun 13, 2017 11:59 pm

Ioana wrote:Hello Fay,

I am an ABA therapist. If you need any help with your child program please contact me!


Welcome Ioana --

Could you help us out with some suggestions for current parent training videos/materials/resources? I started a thread to use as a consolidated location to post these -- thanks!

Here is the thread:
https://www.autismweb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=34436
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

jaumeb
Posts: 167
Joined: Fri Mar 25, 2016 10:48 am

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby jaumeb » Thu Jun 15, 2017 7:38 am

Thanks Winnie for the info.

fay
Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 11:43 am

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby fay » Thu Jun 15, 2017 11:43 pm

Thanks everyone with links and taking time to post helful comments/links. We are so overwhelmed at the amount of information (biomedical, therapy, ot, speech, ABA, etc) considering autism school to get him started first year, while we are doing research and getting training. Any top schools around TN for this toddlers. We couldn't find one in TN that we liked so far for him. :(

salempeacock
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2016 1:19 pm

Re: need help for our toddler.

Postby salempeacock » Tue Aug 15, 2017 6:43 am

Hi all,
We are planning to do Chromosomal microarray test for my grandson. Any body can suggest labs which do these test privately? UK NHS doesn't do this privately. So looking for labs across EUROPE and USA. Thank you.


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