Suramin reverses autism in mice

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kulkulkan
Posts: 2075
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2012 1:37 pm

Suramin reverses autism in mice

Postby kulkulkan » Thu Jun 19, 2014 1:38 pm

The author had published the suramin study (reversing ASD in MIA mouse model) before, so this is detailed follow up analysis using suramin on the same mouse model. What is interesting is that 17 of 18 biochemical pathways (48 metabolites that were indicative; most of these are already implicated in ASD in other studies) were supposedly corrected by suramin. It would make sense to figure out which of these metabolites are the best biomarkers to study in human trial (to select and objectively measure response) . According to the article, they hope to do a small human trial done by end of this year.

Single Dose Reverses Autism-like Symptoms in Mice
Old drug used for sleeping sickness may point to new treatment in humans

In a further test of a novel theory that suggests autism is the consequence of abnormal cell communication, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that an almost century-old drug approved for treating sleeping sickness also restores normal cellular signaling in a mouse model of autism, reversing symptoms of the neurological disorder in animals that were the human biological age equivalent of 30 years old.

The findings, published in the June 17, 2014 online issue of Translational Psychiatry, follow up on similar research published last year by senior author Robert K. Naviaux, MD, PhD, professor of medicine, pediatrics and pathology, and colleagues.

Naviaux said the findings fit neatly with the idea that autism is caused by a multitude of interconnected factors: “Twenty percent of the known factors associated with autism are genetic, but most are not. It’s wrong to think of genes and the environment as separate and independent factors. Genes and environmental factors interact. The net result of this interaction is metabolism.”


Rest of the article here http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/s ... ms_in_mice
Full study here: http://www.nature.com/tp/journal/v4/n6/ ... 1433a.html

A table of 18 biochemical pathways that were studied:
http://www.nature.com/tp/journal/v4/n6/ ... gure-title

Jupiter
Posts: 219
Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2012 3:55 pm

Re: Suramin reverses autism in mice

Postby Jupiter » Thu Jun 19, 2014 5:09 pm

This drug was discussed here about a year ago.

http://www.autismweb.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=30356

I read through the study you linked, and it appears that the effects of the drug wane fairly quickly, after a week or so.

Also, suramin is pretty toxic, so I would not be rushing to put my child into a study of something that doesn't last long and has the potential to harm.

kulkulkan
Posts: 2075
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2012 1:37 pm

Re: Suramin reverses autism in mice

Postby kulkulkan » Thu Jun 19, 2014 5:59 pm

Yes, it was discussed when the original study was published. This newer study just published goes into much greater detail with more extensive testing.

To me , it isn't Suramin that is promising, but the primary research and hypothesis testing behind it as well as APT therapy in general. There are new classes of experimental APT drugs that are under research as well. The author does seem hopeful to have small human clinical trial done before end of the year. Notwithstanding the toxicity, I think the problem isn't going to be recruitment given it will likely be a very small trial, but rather how to pick say the 10 best candidates to test hypothesis/safety - hopefully it is based on extensive testing.

FatherOf2
Posts: 1664
Joined: Mon Mar 11, 2013 1:37 am

Re: Suramin reverses autism in mice

Postby FatherOf2 » Sat Dec 27, 2014 5:48 pm

On the topic, nice summary:
http://psychiatryneurology.net/2014/01/07/metabolic-features-of-the-cell-danger-response-mitochondrion-2013-pubmed-ncbi/#acceptLicense
The cell danger response (CDR) is the evolutionarily conserved metabolic response that protects cells and hosts from harm. It is triggered by encounters with chemical, physical, or biological threats that exceed the cellular capacity for homeostasis. The resulting metabolic mismatch between available resources and functional capacity produces a cascade of changes in cellular electron flow, oxygen consumption, redox, membrane fluidity, lipid dynamics, bioenergetics, carbon and sulfur resource allocation, protein folding and aggregation, vitamin availability, metal homeostasis, indole, pterin, 1-carbon and polyamine metabolism, and polymer formation. The first wave of danger signals consists of the release of metabolic intermediates like ATP and ADP, Krebs cycle intermediates, oxygen, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and is sustained by purinergic signaling. After the danger has been eliminated or neutralized, a choreographed sequence of anti-inflammatory and regenerative pathways is activated to reverse the CDR and to heal. When the CDR persists abnormally, whole body metabolism and the gut microbiome are disturbed, the collective performance of multiple organ systems is impaired, behavior is changed, and chronic disease results. Metabolic memory of past stress encounters is stored in the form of altered mitochondrial and cellular macromolecule content, resulting in an increase in functional reserve capacity through a process known as mitocellular hormesis. The systemic form of the CDR, and its magnified form, the purinergic life-threat response (PLTR), are under direct control by ancient pathways in the brain that are ultimately coordinated by centers in the brainstem. Chemosensory integration of whole body metabolism occurs in the brainstem and is a prerequisite for normal brain, motor, vestibular, sensory, social, and speech development. An understanding of the CDR permits us to reframe old concepts of pathogenesis for a broad array of chronic, developmental, autoimmune, and degenerative disorders. These disorders include autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), asthma, atopy, gluten and many other food and chemical sensitivity syndromes, emphysema, Tourette’s syndrome, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), traumatic brain injury (TBI), epilepsy, suicidal ideation, organ transplant biology, diabetes, kidney, liver, and heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, and autoimmune disorders like lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis.

FatherOf2
Posts: 1664
Joined: Mon Mar 11, 2013 1:37 am

Re: Suramin reverses autism in mice

Postby FatherOf2 » Sat Dec 27, 2014 5:49 pm

On the topic, nice summary:
http://psychiatryneurology.net/2014/01/07/metabolic-features-of-the-cell-danger-response-mitochondrion-2013-pubmed-ncbi/#acceptLicense
The cell danger response (CDR) is the evolutionarily conserved metabolic response that protects cells and hosts from harm. It is triggered by encounters with chemical, physical, or biological threats that exceed the cellular capacity for homeostasis. The resulting metabolic mismatch between available resources and functional capacity produces a cascade of changes in cellular electron flow, oxygen consumption, redox, membrane fluidity, lipid dynamics, bioenergetics, carbon and sulfur resource allocation, protein folding and aggregation, vitamin availability, metal homeostasis, indole, pterin, 1-carbon and polyamine metabolism, and polymer formation. The first wave of danger signals consists of the release of metabolic intermediates like ATP and ADP, Krebs cycle intermediates, oxygen, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and is sustained by purinergic signaling. After the danger has been eliminated or neutralized, a choreographed sequence of anti-inflammatory and regenerative pathways is activated to reverse the CDR and to heal. When the CDR persists abnormally, whole body metabolism and the gut microbiome are disturbed, the collective performance of multiple organ systems is impaired, behavior is changed, and chronic disease results. Metabolic memory of past stress encounters is stored in the form of altered mitochondrial and cellular macromolecule content, resulting in an increase in functional reserve capacity through a process known as mitocellular hormesis. The systemic form of the CDR, and its magnified form, the purinergic life-threat response (PLTR), are under direct control by ancient pathways in the brain that are ultimately coordinated by centers in the brainstem. Chemosensory integration of whole body metabolism occurs in the brainstem and is a prerequisite for normal brain, motor, vestibular, sensory, social, and speech development. An understanding of the CDR permits us to reframe old concepts of pathogenesis for a broad array of chronic, developmental, autoimmune, and degenerative disorders. These disorders include autism spectrum disorders (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), asthma, atopy, gluten and many other food and chemical sensitivity syndromes, emphysema, Tourette’s syndrome, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), traumatic brain injury (TBI), epilepsy, suicidal ideation, organ transplant biology, diabetes, kidney, liver, and heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, and autoimmune disorders like lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis.


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