Folinic acid improves verbal communication in children with autism

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AspieGenes
Posts: 114
Joined: Wed Sep 28, 2016 12:32 pm

Folinic acid improves verbal communication in children with autism

Postby AspieGenes » Wed Oct 19, 2016 11:00 am

Please do not start dosing your kids with folinic acid! :) I happen to think the results will not last or cause other issues. They are only talkng about language here!

http://www.nature.com.sci-hub.cc/mp/jou ... 6168a.html
Folinic acid improves verbal communication in children with autism

We sought to determine whether high-dose folinic acid improves verbal communication in children with non-syndromic autism
spectrum disorder (ASD) and language impairment in a double-blind placebo control setting. Forty-eight children (mean age 7
years 4 months; 82% male) with ASD and language impairment were randomized to receive 12 weeks of high-dose folinic acid
(2 mg kg − 1 per day, maximum 50 mg per day; n = 23) or placebo (n = 25). Children were subtyped by glutathione and folate
receptor-α autoantibody (FRAA) status. Improvement in verbal communication, as measured by a ability-appropriate standardized
instrument, was significantly greater in participants receiving folinic acid as compared with those receiving placebo, resulting in an
effect of 5.7 (1.0,10.4) standardized points with a medium-to-large effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.70). FRAA status was predictive of
response to treatment. For FRAA-positive participants, improvement in verbal communication was significantly greater in those
receiving folinic acid as compared with those receiving placebo, resulting in an effect of 7.3 (1.4,13.2) standardized points with a
large effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.91), indicating that folinic acid treatment may be more efficacious in children with ASD who are FRAA
positive. Improvements in subscales of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, the Autism Symptom
Questionnaire and the Behavioral Assessment System for Children were significantly greater in the folinic acid group as compared
with the placebo group. There was no significant difference in adverse effects between treatment groups. Thus, in this small trial of
children with non-syndromic ASD and language impairment, treatment with high-dose folinic acid for 12 weeks resulted in
improvement in verbal communication as compared with placebo, particularly in those participants who were positive for FRAAs.

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