VAERS data

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srinath
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Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 12:33 pm

Very colorful

Postby srinath » Mon Jun 05, 2006 9:08 pm

Very colorful metaphor winnie as usual. However comepletely besides the point.
For a much better use of windmills as villians ... watch Terminal Velocity. IMHO ... the best film of 1994. Remember the year that brought us "life is like a box of choclate" ... yes that year.
Cool.
Srinath.

LittleManzParents
Posts: 2317
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 4:27 am

Postby LittleManzParents » Mon Jun 05, 2006 10:13 pm

"...But (his) victory was short-lived. The instant he began his pullout, the instant he changed the angle of his wings, he snapped into that same terrible uncontrolled disaster, and at ninety miles per hour it hit him like dynamite. Jonathan Seagull exploded in midair and smashed down into a brick-hard sea.

When he came to, it was well after dark, and he floated in moonlight on the surface of the ocean. His wings were ragged bars of lead but the weight of failure was even heavier on his back. He wished, feebly, that the weight could be just enough to drag him gently down to the bottom, and end it all.

As he sank low in the water, a strange hollow voice sounded within him. There's no way around it. I am a seagull. I am limited by my nature. If I were meant to learn so much about flying, I'd have charts for brains. If I were meant to fly at speed, I'd have a falcon's short wings, and live on mice instead of fish. My father was right. I must forget this foolishness. I must fly home to the Flock and be content as I am, as a poor limited seagull . . .

.
. . . He closed his eyes to slits against the wind and rejoiced. A hundred forty miles per hour! And under control! If I dive from five thousand feet instead of two thousand, I wonder how fast. . .

His vows of a moment before were forgoten, swept away in that great swift wind. Yet he felt guiltless, breaking hte promises he had made himself. Such promises are only for the gulls that accept the ordinary. One who has touched excellence in his learning has no need of that kind of promise...

He was alive, trembling ever so slightly with delight, proud that his fear was under control. Then without ceremony he hugged in his forewings extended his short angled wingtips, and plunged directly toward the sea . . .

His thought was triumph. Terminal velocity! A seagull at two hundred fourteen miles per hour! It was a breakthrough, the greatest single moment in the history of the Flock, and in that moment a new age opened for Jonathan Gull. Flying out to his lonely practice area, folding his wings for a dive from eight thousand feet, he set himself at once to discover (next) how to turn. . . We can lift ourselves out of ignorance, we can find ourselves as creatures of excellence and intelligence and skill. We can be free! We can learn to fly!

The years ahead hummed and glowed with promise.

The gulls were flocked into the Council Gathering when he landed and apparently had been so flocked for some time. They were, in fact, waiting.

"Jonathan Livingston Seagull! Stand to Center!" The Elder's words sounded in a voice of highest ceremony. Stand to Center meant only great shame or great honor. Stand to Center for Honor was teh way the gull's foremost leaders were marked. Of course, he thought, the Breakfast Flock this morning; they saw the Breakthrough! But I want no honors. I have no wish to be leader. I want only to share what I've found, to show those horizons out ahead for us all. He stepped forward.

"Jonahtan Livingston Seagull," said the Elder, "Stand to Center for Shame in the sight of your fellow gulls!"

It felt like being hit with a board. His knees went weak, his feathers sagged there was roaring in his ears. Centered for shame? Impossible! The Breakthrough! They can't understand! They're wrong, they're wrong!

". . . for his reckless irresponsibility," the solemn voice intoned "violating the dignity and tradition of the Gull Family. . . "

To be centered for shame meant that he would be cast out of gull society, banished to a solitary life on the Far Cliffs.

" . . . one day, Jonathan Livingston Seagull, you shall learn that irresponsibility does not pay. Life is the unknown and the unknowable, except that we are put into this world to eat, to stay alive as long as we possibly can."

A seagull never speaks back to the Council Flock, but it was jonathan's voice raised. "Irresponsibility? My brothers!" he cried. "Who is more responsible than a gull who finds and follows a meaning, a higher purpose for life? For a thousand years we have scrabbled after fish heads, but now we have reason to live -- to learn, to discover, to be free! Give me one chance, let me show you what I've found. . . "

The Flock might well have been stone.

"The Brotherhood is broken," the gulls intoned together, and with one accord they solemnly closed their ears and turned their backs upon him.


(Jonathan Livingston Seagull
by Richard Bach)

Winnie
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Joined: Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:48 pm

Postby Winnie » Tue Jun 06, 2006 2:50 am

I suppose that we are not going to discuss the validity/interpretation of the VAERS data -- at least not without suspicions of a conspiracy.

I guess we could just back up and discuss plastic cutlery.
Winnie
"Make it a powerful memory, the happiest you can remember."

srinath
Posts: 941
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2005 12:33 pm

Vaers data

Postby srinath » Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:35 am

We can discuss vaers data, but you brought up Dr G.
I say you're a Burma quill or ABA drill you say I am hallucinating ... OK we square ???
Now back on track.
Cool.
Srinath.

LittleManzParents
Posts: 2317
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 4:27 am

Postby LittleManzParents » Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:36 pm

Winnie wrote:I suppose that we are not going to discuss the validity/interpretation of the VAERS data -- at least not without suspicions of a conspiracy.

I guess we could just back up and discuss plastic cutlery.


Sorry, Pooh. I thought the content was actually discussed pretty well on page 1. I admittedly got distracted by your post about giants and windmills (which was, by the way, an excellent way of getting your point across). I was simply following your lead into story time, presenting the other side of the coin to provide a balanced perspective.

littlebopeep
Posts: 1387
Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2006 5:33 pm

Postby littlebopeep » Tue Jun 06, 2006 1:33 pm

appreciating the classic reading material here......... :P
Fred, 7, NT
Barney, 5, autism


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