AUTISM AND THE GOD CONNECTION

Publish Your Reviews of Books / Videos about Autism, PDD or Asperger's.

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JennysBook

hey

Postby JennysBook » Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:14 pm

Sorry for this But God and the bible was a great story and Jesus was a great man... I donno what to say... YOu and only you will do what you need to do to get results.. One prays for there child to recover from brain tumor one doesnt and My child lived hers died...Never prayed just believed that if he survived I and I alone will bring him back and hes 25 now and works as a chef... Never let a doctor tell you its over till its over... it was tough and he still lives with part of his brain gone but talks walks drives a car and works very hard... and yours all will to just break that glass around them...

JesKlu
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:46 pm

Hello everybody!

Postby JesKlu » Mon Jan 07, 2008 4:20 pm

hello everybody!
I am new to the forum so I say hi to all. But from reading the description of the book it sounds like a nice read. I might check it out.

JesKlu

JesKlu
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:46 pm

Hello

Postby JesKlu » Tue Jan 08, 2008 12:19 pm

merry wrote:Rainman,
Yes, there are a lot of very nice parents and grandparents here who really want to do what they feel is best for their children. As a parent, in the beginning it is hard to accept that your child may not be the child you expected. That doesn't make the parents bad just normal. I think we can help our kids and still be accepting of who they are. Don't you?

Your parents should be very proud of you and I think they must have done everything they could to raise such a fine and caring person as you.

:D :wink: Merry


I agree that treatment is appropriate especially for the more severe cases of autism. And even when they go to school they have treatments like speech therapy, occupational therapy, music therapy, etc. But at the same time you shouldn't be going so far as to try to "fix" your child, or try to make him normal. Because that is exactly the kind of attitude us people with autism hate. And believe it or not, a lot of parents have the "fix it" mentality, or trying to find a cure. Why not just accept that they learn and process things differently? The world would be a much better place if we would just accept others differences.

Jessica

merry
Posts: 346
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 1:55 am

Postby merry » Wed Jan 09, 2008 10:35 am

Jessica,
Yes I agree we should be accepting of others differences and I wish the world worked that way more, but the reality is that it doesn't as much as it should. Our son is doing well and he is the "apple of my eye" and I don't think I could love him more than I do right now. I also have an adult son (probably aspergers) who is now at age 29 graduating from college and I am so very proud of him because I know how hard he has worked for it and born the brunt of the snickers about being a "lifetime student." He is such a special person to all who really know him. Then we have an adult daughter who lives with us and has mental health (aspergers?).....issues but she is a great help with ds and she is my best friend. I think it is normal for parents of all children to want them to be successful (whatever that may mean) and happy and I think that is all the parents here want whether they do bio medicals or not.
I hope you are doing well Jessica
Take care, Merry
Merry mom to A-14 yo boy with autism and type 1 diabetes

JesKlu
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:46 pm

Postby JesKlu » Thu Jan 10, 2008 7:01 pm

merry wrote:Jessica,
Yes I agree we should be accepting of others differences and I wish the world worked that way more, but the reality is that it doesn't as much as it should. Our son is doing well and he is the "apple of my eye" and I don't think I could love him more than I do right now. I also have an adult son (probably aspergers) who is now at age 29 graduating from college and I am so very proud of him because I know how hard he has worked for it and born the brunt of the snickers about being a "lifetime student." He is such a special person to all who really know him. Then we have an adult daughter who lives with us and has mental health (aspergers?).....issues but she is a great help with ds and she is my best friend. I think it is normal for parents of all children to want them to be successful (whatever that may mean) and happy and I think that is all the parents here want whether they do bio medicals or not.
I hope you are doing well Jessica
Take care, Merry


Yeah I'm doing well. I am not against bio meds myself, but the thing is is the attitudes of some of the people who give their children bio meds. I am on the bio med forum now and it is so heartbreaking just to see their attitudes. They think people with autism are just part of an epidemic, not a normal human being. And the other part is, they talk a lot about vaccinations being the cause of autism which I highly disagree, and there is no scientific evidence to back up that claim. I am just upset at their "fix it" attitude. :(

Jessica

merry
Posts: 346
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 1:55 am

Postby merry » Sat Jan 12, 2008 7:34 pm

Jessica,
I saw a report on the evening news a couple of days ago which said the number of children diagnosed with autism is still rising even though the thimerosal has been removed from the childhood vaccinations so I do agree with you on that. I have a cousin with autism and my husband has a cousin who I think has autism but the family says she has only borderline MR, so in our family I believe it is more caused from the genes. What about your family?

I don't like the "fix it" attitude either as I can see the great qualities my children possess that make me proud, of course there still are the challenges but we can work with them to be successful most days.

Merry
Merry mom to A-14 yo boy with autism and type 1 diabetes

JesKlu
Posts: 58
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:46 pm

Postby JesKlu » Sun Jan 13, 2008 10:23 pm

merry wrote:Jessica,
I saw a report on the evening news a couple of days ago which said the number of children diagnosed with autism is still rising even though the thimerosal has been removed from the childhood vaccinations so I do agree with you on that. I have a cousin with autism and my husband has a cousin who I think has autism but the family says she has only borderline MR, so in our family I believe it is more caused from the genes. What about your family?

I don't like the "fix it" attitude either as I can see the great qualities my children possess that make me proud, of course there still are the challenges but we can work with them to be successful most days.

Merry


I think way too many people want to blame vaccines 'cause it is the easiest thing to blame autism on. But recent reports, like you said, told the public thimerosal has been removed from childhood vaccines since 2001, and the number is still on the rise. Why is it on the rise? I think it is on the rise mainly because there is increasing awareness about autism and better diagnostic criteria. And not only that, the number of high functioning cases being diagnosed is pretty surprising, so I just believe it is better awareness, and I believe genes have something to do with it. Even though we don't know the exact cause yet.

About genes in my family, I think my family's genes affected my autism, especially the female genes, which is pretty surprising because usually it is the males who have more problems than the females. But, oh well.

I just accept my disability and live life, even though sometimes it can be hard. But it helps to look more at your strengths than your weaknesses.

Jessica

Lyra
Posts: 41
Joined: Wed Jan 23, 2008 1:51 am

loved this book

Postby Lyra » Thu Jan 24, 2008 3:33 am

I bought this book the day my son was identified as being on the spectrum. It helped me so much to know that autism is not a problem that needs to be fixed, but a gift that we should all be amazed by. There are some things about autism that are hard to cope with, my son bangs his head on things several times a day, and has some intestinal troubles, which I am trying to help repair, but he has so many amazing things about him that totally and completely outweigh the not so great things.
I am glad that he is here and I hope that everyone that knows my son will see that autism is not a bad thing. I really am so glad that I read this book first. I would recommend it to anyone who knows someone on the spectrum. If you are new to autism, it is a great book to help put it all in perspective. It can bring a lot of much needed light to the dark place that coping with autism can, and often will, put people in.


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